My Lord And My God?

WHO declared my Lord and my God?

In the King James Version of the Bible it is translated as: And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God.

Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!”

What is the difference between my Lord and my God?

Lord often refers to the almighty or the creator of the universe or the savior of mankind. Lord is one that rules over others. God is also referred to as supreme. Though there can be only be a few lords who are considered to be on top of others, there are many gods.

What does my God mean?

my God. Expressions of shock, surprise, or dismay, as in My God, don’t tell me he’s dying, or My goodness, what an awful outfit. The first term dates from about 1800; goodness in the variant is a euphemism for God.

What is Jesus’s real name?

Yeshua

What did Thomas say when he saw Jesus?

28 And Thomas answered and said unto him, My Lord and my God. 29 Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed [are] they that have not seen, and [yet] have believed.

Who is my Lord?

The modern pronunciation is “My Lord”. The correct term of address for an English judge depends on his or her appointment. Judges of the High Court and of the Court of Appeal, and certain other judges (notably, Honorary Recorders and judges of the Old Bailey), are addressed as My Lord or My Lady.

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Does Lord mean God or Jesus?

“Jesus is Lord” (Greek: κύριος Ἰησοῦς, kyrios Iesous) is the shortest credal affirmation found in the New Testament, one of several slightly more elaborate variations. (Kelly:13) It serves as a statement of faith for the majority of Christians who regard Jesus as both fully man and God.

Does Lord mean God?

Lord usually translates adonai, which is the equivalent of ruler or master (as in English today). LORD usually translates Yahweh (Jehovah), the sacred covenant name of God. God usually translates elohim, which appears to mean something like “the mighty one.”

Does God mean Baal?

Baal (/ˈbeɪəl, ˈbɑːəl/), properly Baʿal, was a title and honorific meaning “owner”, “lord” in the Northwest Semitic languages spoken in the Levant during antiquity. From its use among people, it came to be applied to gods.